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Colostrum. Dr Alison Stacey, MBBS (Hons) BMedSci DCH DRANZCOG FRACGP Cert IV Breastfeeding Education IBCLC Dip Breastfeeding Management

Colostrum plays a unique role in the transition of the baby to extra-uterine life. It differs from mature breastmilk in a number of ways. Colostrum is a concentrated source of protein, sodium and immunoglobulins (Brodribb 2019). Lower carbohydrate (lactose) levels result in lower volumes; whereas in mature breastmilk, lactose acts osmotically to draw water into the milk (Brodribb 2019). Colostrum also has a laxative effect, helping baby to pass meconium (Brodribb 2019). Secretory IgA, lactoferrin and maternal lymphocytes provide a source of passive immunity to complement that provided via the placenta (Wambach 2016). Human milk oligosaccharides promote the colonisation of baby’s intestinal system with bifidobacteria and act as decoys to prevent infection by pathogens (Wambach 2016).

Colostrum. Dr Alison Stacey, MBBS (Hons) BMedSci DCH DRANZCOG FRACGP Cert IV Breastfeeding Education IBCLC Dip Breastfeeding Management2021-04-05T14:28:24+10:00
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